Technology and Society

Nanotechnology, Quantum Information Technology, Society: Course, Definitions, Essays

February 8th, 2008  |  by  |  published in All, Technology and Society

Exploring advanced classical and quantum technologies and their societal implications. Definitions and essays on nanotechnology and quantum technology.

Quantum Information Technology and Industry

February 7th, 2008  |  by  |  published in All, Essays, Featured, Technology and Society

Quantum Information Technology and Industry

A new era of physics careers in industry is about to begin, based on the quantum information science/technology (QIS/T) revolution. Whether this statement is true, or can be made to be true, is something we should consider. From my viewpoint, the chances are improving, but there are still roadblocks.

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Spookytechnology and Society

October 12th, 2007  |  by  |  published in All, Blog, Essays, Highlights, Technology and Society

Spookytechnology and Society

Spookytechnology and Society: Understanding and anticipating the second revolution in quantum-designed technologies Download the article this summary is based on: C. Tahan, Spookytechnology and Society, submitted for publication. The original preprint can be found on the arxiv (Oct 12, 2007): arXiv:0710.2537. • tahan.com/charlie: Technology and Society • Wikipedia: quantum physics, quantum entanglement, quantum computer Some early press on the preprint […]

Preprint: Spookytechnology and Society

October 12th, 2007  |  by  |  published in All, Preprints, Research, Technology and Society

New technologies based on the exploitation of so-called “second order” quantum phenomena – such as quantum entanglement – deserve a public-friendly, rational, and sexy name. Spookytechnology is that unifying term. From historical and motivational perspectives, this name has greater value than the many variations of quantum this and quantum that presently used. As many already believe, the pursuit of spookytechnology has profound implications for the development of the physical and information sciences and ultimately for society at large. Spookytechnology will find its place in the increasingly dense line of major technological revolutions of our time: quantum, info, bio, nano, spooky.

Chapter: The Nanotechnology R(evolution)

December 23rd, 2006  |  by  |  published in All, Essays, Preprints, Technology and Society

Nanotechnology as a social concept and investment focal point has drawn much attention. Here we consider the place of nanotechnology in the second great technological revolution of mankind that began some 200 years ago. The so-called nanotechnology revolution represents both a continuation of prior science and technology trends and a re-awakening to the benefits of significant investment in fundamental research. We consider the role the military might play in the development of nanotechnology innovations, nanotechnology’s context in the history of technology, and the global competition to lead the next technological revolution.

Identifying Nanotechnology in Society

December 9th, 2006  |  by  |  published in All, Essays, Preprints, Technology and Society

Manufacturing materials and systems with components thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair promises vast and sometimes unimaginable advances in technology. Yet the term nanotechnology has formed as much from people’s expectations as from scientific reality. Understanding the creation and context of this social construction can help us appreciate and guide what may be a burgeoning revolution. This chapter considers what different groups are referring to when they say nanotechnology, how this relates to the science involved, and how the various definitions of this broad field of endeavor might be improved. The ramifications and implications of these seemingly innocuous naming choices are also discussed. Although in many respects nanotechnology serves as cover justification for increased spending in the physical sciences, at present it is the most hopeful route to solving some of the planet’s greatest problems.

Identifying Nanotechnology in Society

December 8th, 2006  |  by  |  published in All, Essays, Technology and Society

preprint; Chapter in Advances in Computers 71:Nanotechnology, edited Marvin Zelkowitz, Elsevier, 2007 Identifying Nanotechnology in Society Charles Tahan Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK charlie@tahan.com (2006) Manufacturing materials and systems with components thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair promises vast and sometimes unimaginable advances in […]

STS 201: Nanotech+Society

October 7th, 2006  |  by  |  published in All, Courses, Technology and Society

STS 201: Nanotech+Society An undergraduate course taught in the spring semester of 2005 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A non-technical, discussion-based introduction to nanotechnology and science and technology studies. Nanotechnology and Society: A discussion-based undergraduate course. (preprint, published PDF, scitation access in Am. J. Phys., 74, 443, 2006) Talks 1. Teaser introduction to nanotech with some consideration of […]

Nanotechnology and Society: A discussion-based undergraduate course

July 8th, 2005  |  by  |  published in All, Nanotechnology, Papers, Preprints, Technology and Society

Am. J. Phys. 74, 4 (April 2006)

Nanotechnology has emerged as a broad, exciting, yet ill-defined field of scientific research and technological innovation. There are important questions about the technology’s potential economic, social, and environmental implications. We discuss an undergraduate course on nanoscience and nanotechnology for students from a wide range of disciplines, including the natural and social sciences, the humanities, and engineering. The course explores these questions and the broader place of technology in contemporary societies. The course is built around active learning methods and seeks to develop the students’ critical thinking skills, written and verbal communication abilities, and general knowledge of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts. Continuous assessment was used to gain information about the effectiveness of class discussions and enhancement of student understanding of the interaction between nanotechnology and society.

Tahan Research

http://research.tahan.com/

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