Nanotechnology

On-chip cavity quantum phonodynamics and acceptor qubits in silicon

September 8th, 2013  |  by  |  published in All, Featured, Highlights, Nanotechnology, Phonitons, Quantum Computing, Research

On-chip cavity quantum phonodynamics and acceptor qubits in silicon

We show how long-lived and tunable acceptor impurity states in silicon nanomechanical cavities can play the role of a matter non-linearity for coherent phonons just as, e.g., the Josephson qubit plays in circuit-QED.

Phys. Rev. B: On-chip cavity quantum phonodynamics with an acceptor qubit in silicon

August 30th, 2013  |  by  |  published in All, Nanotechnology, News, Papers, Phonitons, Quantum Computing

Phys. Rev. B: On-chip cavity quantum phonodynamics with an acceptor qubit in silicon

We describe a chip-based, solid-state analog of cavity-QED utilizing acoustic phonons instead of photons. We show how long-lived and tunable acceptor impurity states in silicon nanomechanical cavities can play the role of a matter nonlinearity for coherent phonons just as, e.g., the Josephson qubit plays in circuit QED. Both strong coupling (number of Rabi oscillations ≲100) and strong dispersive coupling (0.1–2 MHz) regimes can be reached in cavities in the 1–20-GHz range, enabling the control of single phonons, phonon-phonon interactions, dispersive phonon readout of the acceptor qubit, and compatibility with other optomechanical components such as phonon-photon translators. We predict explicit experimental signatures of the acceptor-cavity system.

Introducing the phoniton: A sound-based analogue of cavity-QED, a tool for controlling sound at the quantum level

November 28th, 2011  |  by  |  published in All, Blog, Featured, Highlights, Nanotechnology, Papers, Phonitons, Research

Introducing the phoniton: A sound-based analogue of cavity-QED, a tool for controlling sound at the quantum level

This work explores the possibility of a new, man-made quantum object: a hybridization of a localized, long-lived phonon (a quantum of sound) and a matter excitation. That this is possible is not obvious.

Nanotechnology and Society: A discussion-based undergraduate course

July 8th, 2005  |  by  |  published in All, Nanotechnology, Papers, Preprints, Technology and Society

Am. J. Phys. 74, 4 (April 2006)

Nanotechnology has emerged as a broad, exciting, yet ill-defined field of scientific research and technological innovation. There are important questions about the technology’s potential economic, social, and environmental implications. We discuss an undergraduate course on nanoscience and nanotechnology for students from a wide range of disciplines, including the natural and social sciences, the humanities, and engineering. The course explores these questions and the broader place of technology in contemporary societies. The course is built around active learning methods and seeks to develop the students’ critical thinking skills, written and verbal communication abilities, and general knowledge of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts. Continuous assessment was used to gain information about the effectiveness of class discussions and enhancement of student understanding of the interaction between nanotechnology and society.

Tahan Research

http://research.tahan.com/

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